South Fork & Henry's Fork Fishing Reports

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Fishing Reports

Jimmy's All Seasons Angler / Fishing Reports (Page 22)

Henry’s Fork 8-8-15

Looks like Henry’s Lake Outlet part of the river is now diminishing as a quality fishery for the year. That’s because flow out of Henry’s Lake has dropped meaning shallower and warming water.  This will move fish downstream to the Henry’s Fork.  For the near future you can find them in the Tubs area above Mack’s Inn.  Try streamer patterns.  For the rest of the river presenting terrestrial patterns is the best way to fishing success.

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Henry’s Fork 8-4-15

AM and PM spinner falls and daytime terrestrial insects (particularly ants and hoppers) are providing most of the action on the upper river. So have patterns for these available. Are you fishing the river in Harriman State Park just before and after sunset? Don’t be shy about offering a hair mouse pattern along grassy banks especially if deeper water is nearby. Big Daddy may be waiting!  In middle reaches of the river terrestrial insect and caddisfly life cycle patterns rule the effectiveness roost, particularly during PM hours. On the river below Ashton Dam warmer waters are present, so early in the day visits require spinner patterns, rusty and otherwise.  Caddisfly and terrestrial insect patterns are appropriate for later in the day. Also be sure to have streamer patterns ready as sundown comes about.

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South Fork 8-4-15

Flow and water temperature have been stable for days. Pink alberts are taking their spots in providing action in riffles with their emergence beginning around mid-morning. The other happening is that mutant golden stoneflies are working their way up the river. Currently they are quite numerous in the Byington to Twin Bridges area.  Caddisflies always provide evening action, and streamers presented under low light conditions, especially if you observe bait fish jumping and scurrying, can bring action from the big guys.

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Small Streams 8-4-15

Caddisflies stay active on most of our small streams this time of the season.  Terrestrial insects also become important food forms for trout. As discussed in our Yellowstone Park report, having patterns for these along is now important. The other consideration to realize is that many of our smaller streams are warming up as waters drop to base levels. Streams that have a large water component from springs (Birch, Big Elk, Bitch, Diamond, Little Lost, Teton River) or water from lakes with subterranean outlets(Palisades) tend to stay cooler longer than those that do not have as much of such (Robinson, Bear, Pine, Upper Blackfoot) or are subject to draw-down ( lower Fall River). So concentrate your efforts on those with cooler inflows and be sure to have terrestrial patterns in your fly box.

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Yellowstone Park 8-4-15

Any stream you choose to fish in the Park, this is the season when terrestrial insect patterns should be in your fly box.  Dry ant, beetle, cranefly, cricket, hopper, and sprucefly patterns fished near overhead cover, especially adjacent to deep water are the names of the game. Consider that the days are getting shorter meaning that it takes water and surroundings a bit longer to heat up for insects, then fish to become active. So concentrate your fishing efforts with these patterns into the afternoons. Fastest action currently in the Park, you ask? For moving water try Boundary, Obsidian, Soda Butte, or Slough Creeks. For still waters try either Beula or Riddle Lakes.

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Henry’s Fork 7-28-15

It’s time to break out those terrestrial patterns for fishing the upper river. Except for speckled duns, upcoming tricos, and late season BWOs, the big mayfly emergences are over. Long drifts of ant, hopper and beetle patterns in front of bank side cover where water has some depth will one of the best places to target.  Breezes will help not only to help obscure your presence, but help drop bugs into the water.

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South Fork 7-28-15

Flow out of Palisades Dam has been lowered only slightly over the past several days. It’s now a bit more than 9500 cfs. The river is warming a bit with water out of the dam now at 60 degrees F.  That temperature is not high enough to have a big impact on hatches. Getting into the middle 60s in same degrees begins impacting mayfly hatches. Caddisflies seem to be not as affected. So get out and enjoy those PMDs and pink alberts that makes South Fork riffle fishing so much fun, but be sure to have hopper patterns in that fly box.  They are around on the lower river and become more important to fish as the days go by.

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Small Streams 7-28-15

Our recent thundershowers and showers benefit regional small streams big time. Flows stay up and water temperatures tend not to rise as they would under drier conditions.  Another benefit is that increases in relative humidity before an particularly after a storm enhance aquatic insect emmergences. But for sure it is best to delay fishing for a day or so after a moderate rainfall, or to wait until a stream known to discolor clears up.   Some area streams that have benefited from recent rainfall include the South Fork/Palisades Reservoir tributaries (Palisades, Big Elk, Bear, McCoy Creeks), Bitch Creek, Medicine Lodge Creek, Beaver Creek, Diamond Creek, Little Lost River/Sawmill Creek, and the Salt River tributaries. These streams are all uncrowded, and they are beginning to see plenty of terrestrial insects in surroundings. Some host trout to trophy sizes.  Get in touch with us for more info on any of them and on other small streams worthy of a visit.

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Still Waters 7-25-14

We have good reports from Chesterfield and Springfield Reservoirs. At Springfield try dry damselfly and dry speckled dun patterns. For Chesterfield, fish  near the reservation boundary and try renegade patterns on the surface. Are fish taking these for ants? Who knows!

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