South Fork & Henry's Fork Fishing Reports

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Fishing Reports

Jimmy's All Seasons Angler / Fishing Reports (Page 34)

Henry’s Fork 9-2-14

This coming two weeks is one of my favorite times to fish the Harriman State Park reach of the river. Crowds are definitely down, and more enjoyable weather prevails.  Surely there are many approaches to fish the river during this time, and all can produce under the right conditions. Because it produces for me, my favorite is through long drifts around cover using a hopper pattern. I prefer using this technique with traditional patterns. That is because I believe their imprint on the smooth surface of the river here is closer to that of the natural insect than those patterns fashioned from foam and rubber. And this technique with traditional patterns produces for me on other streams with similar surfaces. On water of broken surface this difference is minimized. When presenting  with a long drift be aware of drag, strive for a natural drift as long as possible, and wade as little as is practical.

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Small Streams 9-2-14

Palisades Reservoir tribs are fishing quite well these days. Now that Labor Day weekend is behind us there will be fewer anglers on all these. Hoppers are out in abundance around all these streams, so are Mormon crickets, craneflies, ants, and beetles. Big Elk Creek could be an exception with respect to number of anglers because of the annual kokanee run and the anglers trying to catch them.  Flavs are out there, and the kokanee do not inhibit the cutts from rising to flav emergers in the afternoon.  McCoy Creek, being roadside for many miles, is most easily accessed, and easiest to fish. Bear Creek has beaver ponds (so does McCoy Creek) up and down its length, and these surely host the best fish in the creek.  Also consider that any fly that works on these streams will also work on Palisades Creek below the reservoir.

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Still Waters 8-30-14

Unfortunately we post the following notice from the Southeast Region Office of IDF&G. That notice is that boats cannot be launched at the Chesterfield Reservoir launch site because of low water.  Water in the reservoir is low to the point that this site is far enough from the water level that attempts to launch will become mired in mud deep enough to bog trailers and vehicles.  On a positive note, boats can be launched onto Daniels Reservoir where water temperatures have cooled to the point that fishing is good with midge pupa patterns under an indicator, small leech patterns, and speckled dun life cycle patterns.  The same applies to Springfield Reservoir.

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Yellowstone Park 8-26-14

Recent rains impacted fishing on Park streams. The Lamar River discolored quite a bit, and Slough Creek had some discolor. Conditions are returning to normal, so go back to trico patterns in the morning, terrestrial patterns during daytime, then caddis life cycle patterns in the evening. We are getting near the time of year when browns and rainbows begin migrations into the Madison River. So get those streamer patterns into fishing shape!

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South Fork 8-26-14

From his experience Jimmy offers that the South Fork is currently fishing as good as it can. He fished the upper river later this last weekend, and had great results presenting a variety of flies. In riffles and shallows fishing dry with a Parachute adams trailed with a PMD trailer was very effective. Throwing a chernobyl ant or hopper pattern with or without a nymph trailer produced against banks.  Streamers produced for him later in the day. Mutant stones are out and moving, and each drop in flow out of Palisades Dam exposes more of them.  Good fishing here makes sense because water temperature remains consistent and close to optimum for trout, and there have been no major drops in flow to date, just step downs of hundreds of cfs at any time.

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South Fork 8-23-14

Flow out of Palisades Dam was stepped down to just under 8000 cfs over the last two days and water temp there is 61 deg. F. It cools to around 60 deg. F. as you travel down river. It’s all great news for walk-in wade fishing.  Select a section of river with riffles and walk in. Do not overlook side channels, especially those holding riffles.  We can recommend some candidate locations, so c’mon in. Hitting the banks using hopper and chernobyl patterns from a boat works well, but getting out of that boat to fish riffles works better than floating through them!

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Henry’s Lake 8-23-14

Same story: fish the creek mouths and around the springs using an intermediate. Pattern success seems to vary depending on who you talk to. But a sure fire way for success fishing Henry’s Lake is to pick up a copy of “Fishing Henry’s Lake” by Bill Schiess.  Bill is generous to the point that he shares all his knowledge on Henry’s, and his book is where you find it completely. Within you will see best location and fly pattern selection information for any time of the fishing season.

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Henry’s Fork 8-23-14

From Last Chance to Pinehaven terrestrial patterns will bring the best daytime action.  Fish these around overhead cover.  For the mayfly enthusiasts tricos and speckled duns are emerging, so their dun and spinner patterns are a must, especially in the morning. In the Coffee Pot area terrestrial patterns are best with caddis life cycle patterns doing well in the evening.

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Small Streams 8-23-14

Change your fly-fishing strategy a bit for any small stream that has an increase in flow because of our continued rainy weather. Increased flows tend to wash more worms, grubs, etc into the stream making it easier for fish to get these on the subsurface drift than going to the surface for floating food. Put a few San Juan worms in your fly box, or if you rather not, include some small wooly bugger types. I did better on Robinson Creek earlier this week with (OK, I’ll admit it!) with San Juans than with the dries I love to present.  Certainly water levels will drop to normal, and the dry fly fishing that so many enthusiasts enjoy will return soon.

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Still Waters 8-23-14

The cool, wet weather we currently have is just what is needed to bring still water fishing back to good times. Water levels are down in most reservoirs, so shallow water benefits the most.  Midge pupa patterns under an indicator are working well, for example, on deeper parts of Daniels Reservoir. Deep is where the coolest water is, anyway. Another tip: if damselflies are in the air, that means they are still emerging, so  be sure to have nymph and adult patterns in that fly box. Such has been the case with Springfield Reservoir where fishing wet or dry damselfly and speckled dun patterns in the channels around weed beds and around submerged springs has been productive this summer.

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