South Fork & Henry's Fork Fishing Reports

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South Fork

Jimmy's All Seasons Angler / South Fork (Page 34)

South Fork 9-13-2011

With constant flows (about 9000 cfs out of Palisades Dam) the river is fishing its best so far this season.  Early AM and evening streamers are bringing action.  Mutant stones are emerging from crack of dawn to mid day. Riffle fishing for small PMDs emerging and the same for a few slate cream duns during daytime is also productive.  So there is something for dry and wet fly enthusiasts just like the South Fork  of old.  Be on the lookout for mahogany duns and BWOs as we approach the end of the month.  One other item, be sure to keep your vehicles secure and cover any gear left inside. The break-ins reported last week at Lorenzo, Heise and Conant could happen again, especially if we become casual about being vigilant.

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South Fork 9-9-11

We wanted to pass along some unfortunate information concerning vehicle break ins and the theft at several boat ramps in the past few days. Several parties reported that there vehicles had been been either broken in to or the keys removed from the gas tank before their trucks were shuttled.  The thefts occurred  at Lorenzo, the Heise Bridge and Conant Ramps.

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South Fork 9-08-2011

Flow out of Palisades Dam (around 9000 cfs) has been steady for several days. This is about 1500 cfs above normal, but  with maximum water temps in the upper fifties in degrees F., small PMDs and pink alberts are emerging from riffles making for the daytime dry fly fishing for which the South Fork is famed.  Having terrestrial insects  in full abundance doesn’t hurt dry fly fishing either.   During the evening, caddisflies take over as the active insect, and streamers at twilight bring on the big guys.  So whether  you fish from a boat or walk-in wade, these are the days to be on the river.

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South Fork 9-1-2011

Flow out of Palisades Dam has been stable for weeks, and that flow is near normal.  Finally we have the dry fly fishing for which the South Fork is famous.  The small late season PMD  is emerging from riffles, and fish are moving in to feed on them during daytime.  They are also looking for hoppers close to banks and overhead structures, so anything that looks like and is presented to imitate  a hopper will find interest.  Don’t overlook presenting streamers as the sun goes down.

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South Fork 8/29

Flows have remained steady at 9,000 cfs. Fishing has not changed much in way of hatches of dry fly action. I have had some success on flying ants and small stimi’s. Twitching Chernobyl ants in the morning have also bee producing fish. Side channels still seem to hold the most fish, look for fish to be holding in water that tucked away from the main channel.

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South Fork 8/24

Flows were increased today to 9,000 cfs. Not really sure why but I have a feeling it has something to do with farming and irrigation demand. That shouldn’t effect the fishing at all given the season were are having. Yesterday I didn’t have to put a strike indicator on all day! That’s twice this year! Fishing was good. We caught fish on PMD’s Chernobyl ants and bead head droppers below the dry flies. Hoppers are starting to fly so look for fish to be feeding on them as well. Mutant Stones have been hatching, making the morning Chernobyl fishing very good. The streamer fishing is picking up as well. Good luck and fish hard.

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South Fork 8-22-2011

Flow out of Palisades Dam (8560 cfs) is just where it should be considering annual averages, and dry fly fishing success is beginning to be the same with respect to using terrestrial patterns and such as chubby chernobyls.  Look for great September dry fly fishing coming up with success from terrestrial patterns continuing.  Mahogany duns and BWOs will be coming on later in the month to add variety in top water fishing.

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South Fork 8-19-2011

Flow out of Palisades Dam was dropped to 8500 cfs early this AM.  That is the normal flow for this time of year.  Look at Tim’s South Fork report on 8-16 for strategies up and down the river.  If he has been on the river for that many days, he is a first hand source for information.  The only thing I would add is that with decreasing flows likely coming up, dry fly fishing will improve.

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South Fork 8/16

Hi all Tim here, checking in from the river. I wanted to write up the fishing report for today because I have been on the river almost everyday for the last month, and I think I have some insight you might want to hear.

Flows seem to be holding well at 9,000 cfs. There are lots of good riffles and banks to fish. Yesterday was the first day I didn’t tie on a strike indicator! We fished chenobyls with beadhead droppers against the banks and we fished streamers. The streamer fishing is really good this summer. I have had my best success on Olive and White streamers. Nymphing is still the best of way to get into a lot of fish but if your sick of looking at thingamabobbers (like I am) you can fish dries. Its not red hot but fish are eating them. Not many fish up in the riffles eating mayflies but I have found a few every once in awhile.

Most sections seem to be fishing the same. Fish hard and fish at different times of the day, like early morning and late into the evening. As the flows drop look for the mutant stoneflies to start hatching and the hoppers should be turning on anytime now.

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South Fork 8-15-2011

Flow out of Palisades Dam is where it should be for the time of year—9000 cfs.  With lower flows, the river below is clearing and not scouring banks & bottom to release annelids, nymphs, grubs, etc. as in weeks past. That means fish will go to the surface more often to seek food.  So dry fly fishing is finally improving with caddisflies and mayflies emerging and stream side terrestrial insects present in abundance.    Chubby chernobyls, Berrett’s golden stone, your favorite ant, beetle and hopper patterns, PMD and caddisfly life cycle patterns should be in your fly box.  If you plan to take out of the river at the Twin Bridges south channel site be prepared to push your boat over an upstream gravel bar that has emerged from the dropping flows.  This gravel bar should be visible in the clear water.

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