South Fork & Henry's Fork Fishing Reports

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Yellowstone Park

Jimmy's All Seasons Angler / Yellowstone Park

Yellowstone Park 6-9-18

 

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Run-off waters are receding, but have a way to go yet on many streams.  The Firehole is fishing quite well with PMD and caddis life cycle patterns producing.  One of the best patterns to use here is a partridge and olive or partridge and orange soft hackle, size 12-16.   These are great emerger patterns for caddisflies and mayflies. Be sure to have some in that fly box! White miller emerger patterns will also work well. Also be aware of new closures to protect thermal features along the river.  Shoshone and Lewis Lakes are in good fishing shape, but be aware that trails are in soggy conditions with some snow remaining.  Best fishing on both will be from boats and when streamer and leech patterns are presented. Duck Creek is fishing well or nice rainbows. The meadow is wet and mosquitoes are out in good numbers as is the case in just about anywhere in the park.

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Yellowstone National Park 5-29-18

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All streams in the park, including the Firehole River, are high.   The Ashton-Flagg Road is open to the Jackass Loop just beyond the South Boone Creek crossing.  This prevents access to Fall River in the Park  where water is high with run-off and likely not offering good fishing.  It is likely that this road will not open for about another month for those folks wanting access to Beula Lake and upper Fall River.

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Yellowstone National Park 5-19-18

 

matt nielson

Yellowstone National Park fishing licenses and regulations arrived in the shop today. If you intend to fish in the park during the Memorial Day weekend opening, the Firehole River will likely offer the best fishing, but expect company. Bring BWO, soft hackle (partridge and olive), and caddis life cycle patterns and small nymph patterns with and without bead heads.  Some Hebgen Lake run-up rainbows remain  in the Madison River after spawning. These fish will take streamer patterns swung deep, and some of the best places to encounter them will be from the Barns Holes downstream to Baker’s Hole.

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Yellowstone Park 10-31-17

The Yellowstone Park fishing season ends at the end of the day Sunday, November 5th.  Want enjoy those migrating brown and rainbow trout, or those BWO sipping Firehole browns and ‘bows? Better hurry! Looks like the right kind of weather (stormy) will be present

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Yellowstone Park 10-24-17

 

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Brown and rainbow trout runs are the big attractions now. The run of Hebgen Lake browns and rainbows up the Madison River and mainly into the Gibbon River and the runs from Shoshone and Lewis Lakes into the channel section of the Lewis River have the most participants. The best locations for each of these events require specific activities for angling success. We at the shop can provide information that results in the best chances for enjoying these great angling events. Other brown trout runs in the park worth the effort to enjoy include Yellowstone River fish ascending the Gardner River and Snake River fish doing the same in the Snake River near the south entrance. All these runs are best enjoyed through presenting streamer patterns.

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Yellowstone Park 10-14-17

Lewis R. channel.jpg

If you are looking at a trip to the interior of the park, it might be best to check its web site to see if roads to your planned location are open considering the storm that just passed through the area. Same recommendation with respect to trails to back country waters.  Right now would be a great time for a trip into Lewis River Channel to experience some of the best brown trout fishing anywhere in the region.  Presenting streamers is the name of the game. The only caveat is are trails to the river passable. Crowds certainly will be down considering the weather, so fish would be less disturbed.

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Yellowstone Park 10-7-17

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If you are looking for some of the best streamer fishing available for brown trout this time of year, locations on the Lewis River provide some of the most outstanding in this area. The river between Shoshone and Lewis Lakes offers the best in the park if not the Greater Yellowstone region, at least with respect to numbers of fish.  The trick is to arrive there as early in the day as possible making an overnight stay at the Shoshone Lake outlet campground the best way to do so.  Requiring a 4.5 mile walk as well as having appropriate gear is not suitable for some fly-fishers, but there are easier to approach locations on the river that can offer good fishing, but again the key is to arrive early in the day.  Lewis Lake outlet and the lake itself just above the outlet are good alternative locations requiring only a short walk.  There are fewer fish in the river flowing through the roadside meadow below Lewis Falls, but they run larger than in other locations. In all these locations unsettled or stormy weather typically results in the best fishing.  But because elevation is close to 8000 feet, there is an increased chance for winter driving conditions during this weather. So having a vehicle appropriately equipped is advisable.

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Yellowstone Park 9-23-17

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Lewis River Channel

It’s time to go back to the Firehole River as cooler weather means cooling water to offset the thermal water input. Fall season BWOs and caddis will bring action especially under low light conditions.  Some trico spinner falls remain on the Madison River with BWOs are coming on strong.  If you prefer to pitch streamers, the Madison River in the Park and the Lewis River between Shoshone and Lewis Lake and just below Lewis Lake  are the best places to try,  and these waters will see more trout moving in (browns in the Lewis River, browns and rainbows in the Madison River) as we go through October.  Brown trout runs in other streams (Gardner, Gibbon, Snake) will peak later in the month. Don’t overlook the Yellowstone River for presenting streamers to large resident cutthroat in areas open to fishing from the lake to the falls. Streamer fishing in Heart, Shoshone, Lewis, and Yellowstone Lakes will improve, but the weather will not, so prepare accordingly especially if you pack into any of these lakes.  With killing frosts look for terrestrial insects to diminish, but presenting hopper patterns on meadow sections of all streams will be effective well into October during good weather.

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Yellowstone Park 9-16-17

Big news here is that Hebgen Lake browns and rainbows are beginning to move into the Madison River above. So streamer patterns presented on sink tip lines will become increasingly effective here as the season advances to the first weekend in November when the Park fishing season closes.  The other happening is that the Firehole River is cooling off to the point that resident trout are not in survival danger on being caught and released.  Look for good BWO and caddis activities to attract fish here. The Gibbon River along with Grebe, Wolf, and Ice Lakes have been chemically treated to remove resident rainbow trout and grayling which are to be replaced with grayling themselves. Thus reliable grayling fishing in the park is reduced to Cascade Lake in the Yellowstone River drainage.

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Yellowstone Park 8-22-17

Yesterday park fisheries personnel began treating the Gibbon River to remove all salmonids above Virginia Cascades including Ice, Grebe and Wolf Lakes. Their plan is to eventually introduce fluvial grayling (those now present are adfluvial) and westslope cutts in that section of the drainage including the lakes.   View more details of this action visit the Yellowstone Park Fisheries and Aquatic Science Program web site.

Currently for most of the rivers worth a visit in the park, presenting terrestrial insect patterns brings the best responses from trout.

This time of the season most sources relate that park still water fishing slacks off. This may be true of such as Heart, Lewis, Shoshone, Trout, and Yellowstone Lakes, but it is not the case with Beula Lake. Right now it offers the fastest still water fishing in the park, and likely in the immediate surroundings. To enjoy Beula Lake you must be willing to drive the somewhat rough Ashton-Flagg Road, walk 2.5 miles to the lake, and either wade the shoreline or carry in a flotation device to fish the entire lake.  Cinnamon caddis, speckled dun, and damselfly life cycle and small leech patterns are the best for getting responses from resident Yellowstone cutthroat trout.  Not many regional fly shops tout this serene lake in the Fall River drainage, but we have “the goods” on it, so get in touch if you are considering a visit to this 107 acre lake.

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