South Fork & Henry's Fork Fishing Reports

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Yellowstone Park

Jimmy's All Seasons Angler / Yellowstone Park (Page 10)

Yellowstone Park 5-25-13

Yellowstone Park’s fishing season opens today, so it is time to pass on some information on fishing there this time of year. The Firehole River will be the stream drawing the most attention for a while with  legendary BWO and caddis activity  (Don’t overlook presenting  dragonfly and damselfly nymph patterns on slower reaches).   Gibbon River, Duck and Cougar creeks are in fishing condition.  The Madison River will host a few Hebgen Lake rainbows heading home, but better fishing days there are around the corner.   The Ashton-Flagg Road will not open until the end of June, so those great fisheries east of Calf Creek Hill along the Park’s south boundary are not accessible until then. You can walk  into Bechler Meadows and even fish some of Fall River Meadows, but high water will limit you big time.  The best days fishing in the Park are ahead, and we will keep you well informed of their arrival and progress on this web site.

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Yellowstone Park 10-30-12

Last day of the fishing season here is November 4th.  A few days remain to enjoy browns migrating in the Madison, Lewis, Snake, and Gardner river systems.  Big streamers and bugger types work well them.  It’s a good idea to check the Park web site to observe road and weather conditions before traveling into the interior here.

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Yellowstone Park 10-27-12

The Park has closed several roads because of recent snows.  If you are planning a trip to the Park’s interior, it is a good idea to check its web site for road closures and weather forecasts.  Such as the Madison River along the West Entrance Highway and around Baker’s Hole remain accessible, as does Duck and Grayling  creeks and the Gallatin River. On the south side of the Park the Snake River, featuring a late season brown trout run, is accessible.  For all these streamer fishing is the name of the game.

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Yellowstone Park 10-23-12

Once again weather becomes important in your plans to fish Park waters.  Little of the Park is under six thousand feet in elevation, thus a nice day at four thousand feet in elevation doesn’t mean the same at six or seven thousand feet.  So go prepared with warm clothing including a shell to protect from precipitation and rest assured that will be no more wet wading this year!  Streamer fishing for migrating browns and rainbows and foraging cutthroat will get you into the biggest fish, but BWOs emerging from the Firehole River will make a visit for the top water enthusiast worth considering.

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Yellowstone Park 10-20-12

Brown trout migration is the major Park fishing attraction this time of year, and there are several choice for enjoying this event.  My long-time favorites are the Beaver Meadows of the Madison River and the Lewis River above and below Lewis Lake.  On both of these large streamers are the key, with some in bright and some in somber colors.  Low light conditions are usually best in both places.  Fish in the smaller Lewis River can be stressed more easily, so the best time to fish it is mainly from first light until mid morning when visiting anglers begin to accumulate.   The number of brown trout migrating in this system is the largest  in the Park.  In the larger Beaver Meadows reach of the Madison River, I have had days where good luck lasts the entire day, so long as I fish deep.  But do not restrict your visits to these locations. The run of Yellowstone  River browns into the Gardner River and that of browns into the Snake River above the South Entrance,  are now in progress.  So are runs in Duck Creek, Grayling Creek and into the Gibbon River.  So you don’t like pitching streamer patterns this tome of year?  Try presenting BWO life cycle patterns during afternoon visits to the Firehole River.

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Yellowstone Park 10-13-12

Hebgen Lake browns and rainbows are in the Madison River now. Water temperature is around 50 Deg. F. , and when it drops into the mid and lower forties fishing will improve.  Go after these fish with streamer patterns.  Expect more action on cloudy or stormy days when fish may migrate through shallower water. On bright days they tend to seek the cover of deep holes and runs.  Try nymph rigs if you want to get into more juveniles and whitefish.  If river otters show up, like they did during our visit, find a new place on the river to fish!

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Yellowstone Park 10-6-12

You could say this is the “browns and BWO with some ‘bows thrown in” season.  Browns are beginning their fall migration in such as the Lewis , Madison, Gibbon, and Yellowstone rivers and Duck Creek.  Runs in the Gardner and Snake rivers will come a bit later.  Rainbows are running up the Madison River from Hebgen Lake and are actively rising to BWOs in the Firehole River. Meadow streams still offer fishing with terrestrial patterns. Elk are bugling, geese are honking, wolves are howling, and remaining coyotes are yipping. Those noises sure beat the motorized variety. On top of all this crowds are down on most waters.  So it is a great time to be fishing in the Park.

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Yellowstone Park 9-18-12

Some storms were in the area this last weekend, and we got some reports of good responses to Firehole BWOs during overcast conditions. Other than that, terrestrial patterns most likely are your best bet during daytime. With a bright atmosphere one must be stealthy, so long floats especially to the opposite bank, fly first would be the best strategy on such crystal clear waters as Slough Creek,  Soda Butte Creek,  Bechler River, Fall River, and Boundary Creek.  Other choices for good fishing would be the morning trico mating-spinner fall activity on many of the Park waters or  early or late in the day streamer fishing in waters where brown trout are stocking up and beginning spawning migrations.

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Yellowstone Park 9-15-12

Air temperatures drop into the teens during night time now. That’s the reason for fishing picking up on the Firehole River.  That drop in temperature also helps convince browns and ‘bows to leave Hebgen lake to spawn. So the gulpers are gone for the year there, and the bigger ones now are more interested in heading up the Madison, the South Fork of the Madison, Cougar, Duck, and Grayling creeks.  That means you need streamer pattens for the best chance to meet them.

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