South Fork & Henry's Fork Fishing Reports

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Yellowstone Park

Jimmy's All Seasons Angler / Yellowstone Park (Page 11)

Yellowstone Park 8-21-12

Trico emergences are making for good early in the day fishing on the Madison River and on Fall River Basin streams. It all ends before noon. After that, switch to terrestrial patterns and hope for a cumulus build-up.  The Gallatin River along Highway 191 is fishing very well  if you can find a spot in a pull-out. Early AM trico activity is good.  Afterwards a switch to terrestrial and traditional attractor patterns works.  Later in the day, switch over to dry caddis patterns. The same will work on nearby Grayling Creek, and fewer  folks will be fishing there.

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Yellowstone Park 8-18-12

Tricos are beginning to show in good numbers on many waters making for early AM action.  But presenting terrestrial patterns during daytime remains the best way to get action.  Days with cumulus build-up will offer best  chances.  So will fishing around overhead cover and near well vegetated banks.

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Yellowstone Park 8-14-12

Fastest still water fishing in the Park is, you guessed it, Beula Lake.  Riddle Lake is not far behind.  Both can be fished from shore, but getting out in a float tube results in best fishing. Beula is a longer walk at 2.75 miles, whereas Riddle is  just under two miles over easier terrain.  No complicated flies or strategy are needed for both these small lakes well populated with Yellowstone cutts. Your favorite bead head nymphs, small leech patterns,  speckled dun life cycle, and damselfly life cycle patterns will produce.

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Yellowstone Park 8-11-12

Days with thundershower potential will be your best bet for action.   Timbered reaches provide an all-important background during bright days.  Meadow reaches are so much fun to fish on such as Boundary, Mountain Ash, and Slough Creeks; Bechler, Fall, Gibbon, and Lamar River.  But during these bright days,  consider spending more time on their timbered reaches.  Use the same patterns you would have for water in the meadows. This time of year be sure to have spruce moth patterns available.  And think about getting out of the sack earlier to enjoy the morning trico emergence on most of these streams. It is over by late morning when heat of the day begins setting in.  Beula Lake still offers some of the fastest fishing in the Park.

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Yellowstone Park 8-7-12

Terrestrial patterns should take a “front seat” in your fly box if you intend to fish any stream.   With our bright, clear weather fish them as close as possible to overhead cover, especially on low gradient streams such as Boundary, Duck, and Slough creeks and the meadow reaches of such as Bechler, Gibbon, and Lamar meadows.

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Yellowstone Park 8-4-12

Personnel are monitoring water temperatures throughout the Park to detect any waters where a closure may be necessary to protect hosted trout .  Because we are a Park fishing license vender we receive up front information on any closures. If we hear of any, (hopefully we will not) we will surely post them in this report.  For now, best days to fish almost all streams will  be when thundershowers threaten, and your best bet should be placed on terrestrial patterns.

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Yellowstone Park 7-31-12

Beginning August 1 the Park closes The Madison River within the Park, the Gibbon River below Gibbon Falls and the Firehole River below Kepler Cascades to fishing.  Water temps on each are approaching 80 deg. F.  Look for these streams to be re-opened to fishing when water temps cool to more hospitable levels for trout.  High water temperatures on other streams could result in more fishing limitations within the Park.

Consider that the higher one goes in elevation the less likely water temperatures will reach dangerously high levels for trout.  Within the Park the waters at highest elevation are in the Yellowstone River drainage above the Upper and Lower falls, the Lewis River drainage above the canyon, the Fall River drainage from Beula Lake and above, and Bechler River in the upper canyon.  All of these are over 7000 feet in elevation. Including these with the Gibbon River drainage above Gibbon Falls and the Firehole River above Kepler Cascades makes for plenty of water for concentrating fishing efforts with less impact on trout survival.

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Yellowstone Park 7-28-12

On any of the Park’s meadow streams, ie Lamar, Bechler, Madison, Fall, Lewis, Gibbon rivers, Boundary, Duck, Slough, Obsidian, Soda Butte creeks, its time to be the “Henry’s Fork Hunchback”.  It’s a great time of the season to be on this type of water.  But low, clear slow flowing water offers less overhead cover in mid summer, so fish are more skittish.  Keep out of sight as much as possible and do everything you can to present those terrestrial patterns with a natural drift.  Also best times for success are early and late in the day.

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Yellowstone Park 7-24-12

Time to think terrestrial patterns on streams and shorelines of lakes. That thought applies to almost all Park waters.  One exception is the big stoneflies moving up through the Yellowstone River canyon above Gardner.   A good way to enjoy fish responding to them is to take a four-mile walk to the river down Blacktail Deer Creek. It’s a big river here, nearly the size of the South Fork reach of the Snake River, and you will have to commit to either side.

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